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  #11  
Old 07-15-2021, 10:20 PM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
I believe the cam timing is correct cause when I line up the zero mark on the flywheel the mark on the cam sprocket lines up with it's timing mark.
Apparently Your Engine is different than what I am familiar with. I have not seen camshaft timing marks on the cam sprocket and have no idea how to time it that way, so am no help to you there, sorry.

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
Should I check the IP timing using a dial feeler gauge or leave it as is cause it seems to drive like before but even before at probably 3/4 throttle it's shoots out black smoke. Thanks
That is the main way to time the IP, with a dial gauge and extension rod and sleeve. Anything else is just guessing, and luck maybe.

The excess smoke at 3/4 is likely a combination of smoke screw turned in too far, LDA diaphragm adjustments maladjusted, over optimistically modified fuel enrichment pin, and as you indicated, mis-timed IP. But that's just my guesses, based on information given.
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  #12  
Old 07-15-2021, 10:27 PM
v8volvo v8volvo is offline
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Originally Posted by ngoma View Post
And more importantly, according to your photo, if the belt jumped the teeth on the sprocket, the IP sprocket mark would be on the other side of the IP and bracket marks, because of the engine rotation direction.
Good point. According to that photo it does look like the pump is off time but in the advanced direction. I guess in theory this could happen when shutting off the engine depending on where/how the engine and IP stopped turning.

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
I believe the cam timing is correct cause when I line up the zero mark on the flywheel the mark on the cam sprocket lines up with it's timing mark.
On some engines, the logic of what you are saying here would be right on. BUT on this engine (like many diesel engines and some gas engines also), the cam sprockets are NOT keyed to the camshaft. Neither one of them -- the front or the back. They can be installed on the cam in any position, and are affixed by taper or flat friction fit. The purpose of this is to allow an infinite range of adjustment for cam and IP timing. Necessary because the diesel engine demands this level of precision, and timing it just to the closest tooth on the belt wouldn't have been exact enough.

So what that means is that the mark on the rear cam sprocket doesn't really mean anything. The only reason it even exists is that VW cleverly use the exact same sprocket on the back of the cam and on the IP, just mounted facing the opposite direction, and thus it has to have a mark for where it's installed on the IP. But on the cam, that notch serves no purpose and should just be ignored so as not to cause confusion.

Unless you are talking about marks on the front cam sprocket? That sprocket has no marks from the factory, so maybe you are talking about paint marks? If paint marks are what you are seeing, then it's perhaps good news that they line up. But the bad news is that those marks were made by a human mechanic sometime, during a stumbling attempt to replace the timing belt, not by the factory. So their accuracy is only as good as the guy who marked it made them. And the fact that they are there almost always means the timing belt was done without the correct tools and process. And THAT probably means the front crankshaft harmonic balancer bolt is not as tight as it should be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DylanW
I also tried to retime the IP but afterwards the engine wouldn't even idle just start up and die. So I timed it back to what looks to be a tooth off but it runs much better and is able to idle.
....
Should I check the IP timing using a dial feeler gauge or leave it as is cause it seems to drive like before but even before at probably 3/4 throttle it's shoots out black smoke. Thanks
How were you timing the pump? By loosing the mounting bolts and rotating it, and doing visual timing with the marks?

Strongly again suggest getting your hands on a copy of the D24 "greenbook" Volvo factory manual. Well known on here to be worth every cent, full of extremely helpful info. After you read the sections on timing belt replacement, etc, it will help the engine make a lot more sense. Looking on ebay right now there are many out there, costing $20 or less with free shipping. The best money you will spend on this car by far. They are EASY to work on the right way, but can get you in trouble if you try to just feel your way through it using accustomed methods learned on other engine designs.

Think of it like an aircooled VW versus a small block Chevy -- it's not more complicated or harder to fix, but it IS different. Putting in a little time up front to understand how it is designed will pay you back many times over as you work with it.

I would check the torque on that front crankshaft dampener bolt before thinking about anything else. You need special tools for it -- that manual will be your friend to show you the process which is very simple and easy. If you need the special tools they are available to borrow on this site for free.
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  #13  
Old 08-06-2021, 10:00 AM
DylanW DylanW is offline
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So after driving for about 1 week one of the injector hardlines developed a crack in it near the union nut. I took off the cracked line and another one to get access to the cracked one and attempted to fix the cracked line. When I put the lines back on it doesn't want to start. I also decided to check the IP timing and found it was at 1.1mm at TDC. This seemed really high so I set it down to around .85mm. Also how long does it take to bleed air out of the lines?
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  #14  
Old 08-06-2021, 07:57 PM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
So after driving for about 1 week one of the injector hardlines developed a crack in it near the union nut.
WATCH OUT! The hardlines need ALL the clamps in place, and in good condition. Otherwise the hardlines are more prone to breaking from the vibration. Also, they do not seem to like the "time the IP by rotating it" method-- it stresses them too much at the ends. ALSO: DONT OVERtorque the union nuts-- 18 lb-ft is the spec, no reefing on those!

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
I took off the cracked line and another one to get access to the cracked one and attempted to fix the cracked line.
How do you fix a cracked hardline? I didn't think it was possible. Sees over 2,000 PSI. Be careful, fuel ejecting from a broken hardline is under high pressure and can break/emter skin, often requiring amputation no joke.

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
When I put the lines back on it doesn't want to start. I also decided to check the IP timing and found it was at 1.1mm at TDC. This seemed really high so I set it down to around .85mm. Also how long does it take to bleed air out of the lines?
Did you check with the cold start mechanism disabled?
Can take several minutes cranking. Best to have the battery charger hooked up. Do not burn up the starter. 10 sec. crank, 20 sec cooldown, 10 sec. crank, etc.
But in your case looks like you only opened 2 hardlines? Shouldn't take too long for the engine to at least start, may run rough at first.
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  #15  
Old 08-07-2021, 07:00 AM
DylanW DylanW is offline
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Ok so when bleeding the lines it only takes cranking over the engine for a good amount of time or do I need to regularly crack the unions loose to get the air out.
Also I took the fuel line that goes from the filter to the pump and when doing so all the fuel got sucked down into the filter. Is this normal or is there an air leak somewhere?
And about the the cracked line I grounded it out with a Dremel and welded it closed.
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  #16  
Old 08-07-2021, 10:36 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
Ok so when bleeding the lines it only takes cranking over the engine for a good amount of time or do I need to regularly crack the unions loose to get the air out.
I used to think that was important but not so much anymore. Maybe if you want to see how close it is getting you can open one of the unions at the injector to see when it starts spurting fuel, that means it is getting close.

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
Also I took the fuel line that goes from the filter to the pump and when doing so all the fuel got sucked down into the filter. Is this normal or is there an air leak somewhere?
Simple gravity acting on a fluid when you opened the closed system. Actually it probably drained back into the tank. If it happens by itself then you have a problem with a leak.

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Originally Posted by DylanW View Post
And about the the cracked line I grounded it out with a Dremel and welded it closed.
OK good to know that can work. Hope it holds up!
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