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  #1  
Old 09-26-2020, 03:32 AM
ian2000t ian2000t is offline
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Default Bosch VE input shaft seal

How hard is it to change the input shaft seal on the Bosch VE pump?

I saw there is a special Volvo tool, but I don't have one of those unfortunately!

Can it be changed without a pump strip?
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  #2  
Old 09-26-2020, 09:26 AM
v8volvo v8volvo is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ian2000t View Post
How hard is it to change the input shaft seal on the Bosch VE pump?

I saw there is a special Volvo tool, but I don't have one of those unfortunately!

Can it be changed without a pump strip?
It's quite easy to replace without taking the rest of the pump apart, but unfortunately it's almost impossible to do so with the pump still on the engine. It might be possible if using a tool like the one mentioned in this post, or similar: https://d24t.com/showpost.php?p=9501&postcount=3

However, in order to use that tool with the IP still mounted to the engine, you'd first need to get the IP belt drive sprocket off with the pump in the car, which is very tricky to do because of the tight clearance to the firewall. Most pullers will not fit. The only one that is known to work is the official Volvo puller tool, #9995204, pictured here. https://www.classicswede.co.uk/99952..._11057662.aspx Extremely hard to find here in the States, though perhaps it would be easier where you are. At any rate, if you get that tool and can get the sprocket off, then can get the seal puller lever, you can theoretically do the whole job with the IP in the car. That is method #1, potentially doable if you are lucky enough to get hands on the specialized equipment, and even then I am not sure (haven't tried it, maybe someone else has?) that there would be enough room.

If not, method #2, doable without the special tools, is to remove the IP along with its mounting bracket from the engine, then do it all on a workbench, where you have plenty of room to use more standard type gear pullers to get the sprocket off, and can use various types of seal removal tools (including the thread-in type) for pulling the seal. More work to do it this way, but still not a difficult job, just more steps and more time, and getting at the pump bracket bolts and all the fuel line unions can be somewhat tedious.

Of course in method #2 you are also faced with resetting rear timing belt tension and setting IP timing after reinstalling the pump, since the position of bracket on engine is disturbed in the process, and usually the position of pump on bracket is also disturbed since it is far easier to separate the two on the bench and reinstall them one by one than try to fish the bracket-to-engine bolts back in with the pump mounted on the bracket. Also re-priming the fuel system, etc. You probably are well familiar with the timing process though and know it's no big deal.

Conversely with method #1, if it's possible, in principle the timing doesn't have to be disturbed and as long as you reassemble carefully after seal replacement everything should go back together the same as it was before.

Then finally, if the shaft seal is leaking, there is always the option of having the entire pump resealed or rebuilt by a Bosch shop, since other seal leaks are sometimes not far behind. These pumps are all 20 or 30 years old now and often benefit from a refresh at some point in life. So can be a justifiable idea to just get it all done at once, especially if the pump has to come off the engine anyway.

Last of all, if you do method #2 and have the injection pump off, that is a great chance to proactively replace #5 and #6 glow plugs which are extremely difficult access with the pump in place but very easy with it removed.

What are the symptoms you are seeing to necessitate replacement of the shaft seal? Leaking air in and hard to start? And/or leaking fuel out?
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  #3  
Old 09-26-2020, 11:19 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Even for R/R the seal with the IP out of the car, get that trick seal puller, it's well worth it.

Additional:

If the IP belt has been run too tight for some time, there is a chance the mainshaft bushing has worn oblong, causing any new seal to fail prematurely.
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  #4  
Old 10-04-2020, 08:02 AM
jetfiremuck jetfiremuck is offline
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Get a double lip viton seal well worth it.
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  #5  
Old 10-04-2020, 10:47 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Interesting. Do you have a part number?
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