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Old 11-12-2019, 01:01 PM
Richode Richode is offline
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Default Timing Belt and IP belt kit part numbers

picking up a 95 d24tic 940 at the weekend and will be wanting to do both belt kits asap so looking for part numbers of everything i'll need to do these jobs or links to good quality kits for the jobs

thanks in advance
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Old 11-12-2019, 04:55 PM
v8volvo v8volvo is offline
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Good idea, definitely best to get the belts squared away early on so that you know they won't cause you trouble.

I believe a 1995 model TIC engine would have the later style and less common revised front timing belt setup, where the water pump is mounted in a fixed position and belt tension is adjusted by a separate, small tensioner roller close to the cam sprocket that exists in addition to the large fixed idler roller near the crankshaft. This late setup is different from the earlier style engines which had no dedicated tensioner roller, only had the one large fixed idler roller and a water pump with slotted mounting holes, which are used to change the pump's position for setting belt tension.

The later setup (if you have it) is an improvement, in part because the tensioner is on the slack side of the belt and thus the belt tension can be adjusted on those late engines without affecting cam and IP timing. One of the downsides of the early setup is that the water pump is on the drive side of the timing belt, and as a result any change in belt tension setting also requires resetting the camshaft and injection pump timing afterwards, since they get changed in the process. It's also easier to set the tension correctly with the tensioner than with the sliding water pump.

However, if you have the later setup then you will need to make sure to get a belt kit that has parts for it, as a parts kit intended for the early style setup will not work at all on the late setup, and vice versa.

Probably first step would be to pull the front belt cover off and inspect what configuration your engine has, unless you already know. Then you will be able to find a kit that matches what you need. Feel free to post a picture here of what you see if you have any doubt as to which it is.

Best belt brands are generally Dayco, Gates, Continental/ContiTech. Water pumps are best from Hepu, Geba, or Laso. Make sure you get a water pump that has the original style large cast type impeller rather than the smaller cheap stamped steel impellers that are on lower quality pumps like the ones sold by GMB. Idler and tensioner rollers are best from INA or SKF, which are both OEM sources. Again, avoid GMB. If you find a complete belt kit, ContiTech kits usually have good parts, as do those from Ruville and Gates. Avoid anything from an unknown brand, cheap seller on ebay, or other questionable source or any price that seems lower than it should be. The timing belt area is one of the most critical places to get the highest quality parts possible and worth spending more for them if necessary.

Don't know what will be most easily available in your area, others from your side of the pond may have more tips on good suppliers and sources.

Good luck, welcome to the forum and let us know how you make out.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:23 PM
jpliddy jpliddy is offline
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Default 940 tdi AUTO 1995

hi
part numbers for post 1993 d24 tic are
water pump 8692839
idler roller 9135946 INA make all steel roller
tensioner pully 9135937 ruville try EURO CAR PARTS online with discount code
injection pump belt 1257237 75 teeth
cam belt 9135933 120 teeth

as V8VOLVO SAYS use good quality parts
im based in stoke on trent staffs for advice had my car 20 years now
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Old 11-17-2019, 08:15 PM
v8volvo v8volvo is offline
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Nice notes on the part numbers for the late TIC engines. Thanks jpliddy for giving those.
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Old 09-13-2021, 06:27 PM
RedArrow RedArrow is offline
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Default Timing belt of the d24, d24t

Reading about the d24t engines today somewhere on another car forum, I randomly found someone`s very old post from 2005 or 2006 (745turbogreasel) mentioning our timing belts...

Here`s the post (a quote from that member):

"I get 32 MPG fom my 745 TD stickshift at 75 MPH on the highway with a decent load. I don't know how many miles are on the motor, but it is in the process of getting new Tbelts and headwork right now. I;'m kind of glad the HG blew, as my front timing belt had lost 2 teeth in less than 2 years. Cheap timing belts=bad. there is a brickboard member who contacted an aviation company about making custom steel core belts, and they said about $35 each with a minimum order of 10. Might be more important as you raise the RPM limit."

I`m wondering if this has even been actually done by anyone because it seems like an interesting idea. Might help the d24 driver feeling `more calm` about the (in-)famous TB )
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Old 09-14-2021, 03:17 PM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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I would ask: "What would be the benefit?"
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Old 09-14-2021, 08:00 PM
RedArrow RedArrow is offline
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I am not sure, maybe a stronger belt I guess.
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  #8  
Old 09-15-2021, 10:12 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedArrow View Post
the (in-)famous TB
So the "(in-)famous TB" reputation is caused by weak belts?

Not by missed maintenance schedule replacements? Not by improper torquing of the crank pulley? Not by improper tensioning?
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Old 09-15-2021, 09:20 PM
RedArrow RedArrow is offline
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Default A thought about these units in retro Europe

Quote:
Originally Posted by ngoma View Post
So the "(in-)famous TB" reputation is caused by weak belts?
Not by missed maintenance schedule replacements? Not by improper torquing of the crank pulley? Not by improper tensioning?
I don`t know, Ngoma if the belts were weak at all. Instead it was often probably way too aged/worn (or simply not properly assembled).

For example, many of these cars often sat unmoved for years due to dirty or chemically bad fuel, leaky IP etc. Then when put back on the road, the tb was too `tired` from sitting in the same position for too long. (In Europe these cars were often parked due to bad fuel actually. For over many years the fuel was so acidic that all kinds of diesel cars got ruined internally relatively quickly)
If there was bad reputation that probably formed by those who did not set the engine properly and by those whose d24s suffered a catastrophic failure
as a consequence.
Had the belts been just a little stronger, maybe the things would have happened only a bit later or less often

I would probably expect a little longer life out of a `stronger` belt so I found Turbogreasel`s post very interesting.
If, in theory, a better belt actually helped a safer accumulation of those extra `unsafe` miles that were over the suggested 60000miles/100000kilometers than the better belt could be worth it.
According to what I keep reading everywhere about these engines, a high percent of the sudden death scenarios of these engines were somehow related to the timing belt.

Exactly as you pointed out, bad ownership and lack of proper maintenance killed many d24 cars (Volvo, VW LT), slowly or quickly, but, also it was the postponed maintenance not just unskilled tinkering around the timing belt. Very often in higher mile d24 vehicles the timing belt would be The one that was installed in the factory. And the TB service was postponed/ignored in so many cases. There were tens of thousands of LT vehicles in Europe used for long hauling, construction and heavy duty stuff that they were not designed to do... it added some to their bad reputation. I even met one diesel volvo dude who was convinced the engine has timing chain like a w123 benz does. Imagine how often he worked on his car and the oil he used. Then these owners spread/circulated stories

In some ways, "the situation of the tb service postponement" is even worse nowadays for most of the folks who own a d24, as the d-24 specific tools are not exactly readily available , and, it is getting really hard to find one who 1, is willing to work on it, 2, one that`s responsible and aware of how to properly do it. Also it is much much easier to rack up 60k in the USA quickly.

Luckily these cars are getting very old so whoever is brave enough to buy one has some kind of experience or at least a full toolbox of enthusiasm involved.

After reading Turbogreasel`s post I thought IF the belt didn`t have to be serviced `so often`, in theory, maybe at least half of those `overaged` belts that had snapped would only have snapped a few or many thousands of miles later. That can mean extra miles and extra years for the owner to find the proper tools, a trusted mechanic, or both.

Yes, this is all just philosophy and it is best to do the belt on a regular basis. AND, the other TB components age as well (WP gasket, waterpump, idler bearing etc. So... the 60-75k or 4-8yrs sounds like a good plan.
(In fact I heard people had good success with reusing their good quality cast impeller waterpumps, with new gaskets obviously, for a second round of the 60k miles.)

About the crank nut, you are right. It deserves to be called infamous more than the TB does.

Last edited by RedArrow; 09-15-2021 at 09:26 PM.
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