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  #1  
Old 03-22-2020, 03:18 AM
dahicori dahicori is offline
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Default Timing belt - questions about an "easy" version.

Hello!!

I'll just copy and paste a message i posted on a volvo "afficionados" FB group whod consider that a volvo equipped with a D24 is just not a volvo.


" She had not hit the road for 10 years, and yet she carried me home without a glitch (500km), and the old unused gasoil made the mill work alright ( I just feel sorry for the folks behind me on the roundabouts, the smoke was solid dark!). Now I would need some advice from the diesel experts here. I'm looking for changing the timing-belt and Im not so confident in my friend's hack to do it nicely. He crafted himself a tool ( you can see it on the below photo). He told me to use it to maintain the crank pulley, and then just do the job without removing the block (just the radiator!) . He underligned that there were no point at using special tools to block the fuel pump or the camshaft as if one stops the motor naturally, there is absolutely no reason for the camshaft and the pump to move. At the condition, of course, that one handles cautiously the water pump when it comes to the removol / tension of the timing belt. I'd like to hear the pros and cons of such a technique..? Thanks !!"

So i'have red some threads here that consider the change of the IP pump belt as totally necessery for a car that has not been used for years. Can you confirm that?

Have a nice day

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  #2  
Old 03-22-2020, 07:40 AM
v8volvo v8volvo is offline
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I'll just say this: if there were no reason for the special tools and procedures to exist, then why would VW/Audi/Volvo have gone to the trouble of creating them? Manufacturers want to make routine service procedures as simple as they can, because car owners dislike high maintenance costs. ALL older, non-computerized diesel engines (not just the D24) call for complex timing methods requiring special precision equipment because it's the only guaranteed way to preserve the performance, emissions, and reliability the engine is intended to provide. Other methods might SOMETIMES get close enough due to sheer blind luck, but almost always they will result in an engine that runs poorly, doesn't run at all, or sooner or later self-destructs. Luck is nice, but you sure don't want to rely on it.

No offense to your friend, and no doubt he had the best of honest intentions in trying to help with his idea, but I don't think you will find anybody here agreeing that you should ever attempt to cut corners when working with the timing belts. The proper procedure and required tools are the only option.

But fortunately the truth is that if you have the right information and tools, doing the timing belt job the right way is not difficult at all. You will need to allow plenty of time to take with it, but it's not rocket science and nothing to be afraid of. The thing you SHOULD be afraid of is trying an "alternative" method that doesn't end up working out.

Welcome to the forum! There are several members here in France, a number of which have the correct special tools and some experience with the timing belt procedure. One of them might be able to comment on ways to get the tools where you are. And the rest of us here are happy to help with information on any tasks you may need to do.
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  #3  
Old 03-22-2020, 10:52 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dahicori View Post
So i'have red some threads here that consider the change of the IP pump belt as totally necessery for a car that has not been used for years. Can you confirm that?
Yes, confirmed. The TB weakens from use, and age. The materials deteriorate over time, and worse even, when the TB has been setting in the same position for 10 years, it is stressed bent around the small pulley and the fibers will take a "set" and not want to bend back the other way when finally run again. Like the old man who has been sitting in the chair and tries to stand up quickly.

These engines are interference fit, means that if the TB breaks (or is timed incorrectly) the pistons smash into the valves. Will bend the valves, usually damage the pistons, often snaps the camshaft, and can bend the rods.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:37 AM
dahicori dahicori is offline
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v8volvo, ngoma, thank you very much for your reassuring words. My incentive's tank is now full. I am going to read as much as possible before getting into the job, and if I can not find a french member to borrow his tools, I will try to order a set on the web.

Yes, one cannot rely on sheer luck ! I am going to read the greenbook plus the french "RTA" book plus the threads related to timing belt operation. And then, as you say in america, put some balls on it (this is very rude, isn'it?)
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  #5  
Old 03-24-2020, 07:59 AM
dahicori dahicori is offline
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It is difficult to find tools that could be shiped to France.

https://www.outillage-automobile.com...rd-diesel.html

Will it be enought, addition to my home - made crankshaft tool?
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  #6  
Old 03-24-2020, 10:48 AM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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What is your homemade crankshaft tool?

These are the two crankshaft tools you need:

https://www.d24t.com/showpost.php?p=13358&postcount=5
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Old 03-25-2020, 12:29 AM
dahicori dahicori is offline
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you can see it on the photo. The ex-owner told me he crafted it to change de TB.
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Old 03-25-2020, 05:58 PM
ngoma ngoma is offline
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The bar stock laying over the radiator? I don't know. Do you think it can hold against over 360 ft-lbs of torque? This is one area where you don't want to cheat.
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Old 03-26-2020, 11:52 AM
dahicori dahicori is offline
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I understand.

a french member of this forum (michaelovitch) made a tutorial for the D24

here's the link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y55GSG0krmA&t=2s

He unblocks the crankshaft nuts with a big bar, letting it laying loose while doing the rear with the tools, then the front (because the rear is done, the crankshaft will not move ) .

The crankshaft special tool is veeery hard to purchase on the net! I hope I will find it, otherwise I might follow this tutorial.
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  #10  
Old 03-29-2020, 03:41 AM
Mario765 Mario765 is offline
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Hi. I'm from Germany, i did the timing belt a while back. The tools I bought were the pin to block the injection pump, the tool to go in the back of the camshaft and a dial indicator with adapter to check the pump timing. You don't really need the tools to tighten the Crankshaft pulley, if you have a torque wrench that is up to the task. My neighbour had one that goes up to 750nm and is 1,5 metres long! To block the Crankshaft when tightening: Use a chisel, put in in the starter ring of the flywheel and hold it against the transmission bellhousing. Worked for me. Just take care to lign everything up exactly how it's supposed to be and you should end up with a good result. While you're at it, i'd set the valves. Makes the engine so much quieter if it's loud.
Mario
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